Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Jack LaLanne: The Godfather of Fitness

"The only way you can hurt the body is not use it." -Jack LaLanne
IMDB:
Jack LaLanne was addicted to sugar as a child, causing him to commit acts of violence, including setting his parents' house on fire and attacking his brother with an axe. He was so weak his family physician recommended he be removed from school to rest and regain his strength. Around this time, he and his mother attended a lecture by Paul C. Bragg, a nutritionist who told LaLanne he was a human garbage can. LaLanne turned his life around with a strict diet and exercise.

By the age of 18, he was running a home bakery selling healthy breads and a home gym where he trained policemen and firemen in exercise and weightlifting. LaLanne's reputation as a physical fitness guru eventually led to his 34-year stint as the host of TV's The Jack LaLanne Show (1953). There he taught exercise aimed principally at homemakers, using items found around the home.

Even as he exceeded 95 years of age, LaLanne continued to boast a fine physique, and encourage fans with health and fitness tips through videos and writing. LaLanne died of pneumonia at his home in Morro Bay, California, in January 2011, with his wife Elaine, family and friends surrounding him. Mr. LaLanne had been ill prior to his death.

Some of his amazing feats of strength include:
  • "He hasn't had dessert since 1929. He started his own gym in 1936, which included a health food store and a juice bar. He appeared on You Asked for It (1950), where he performed 1,033 push-ups in 23 minutes. 
  • The Jack LaLanne Show was the longest–running television exercise program of all time. It was on television for 34 years.
  • At age 41 proving it possible to escape from Alcatraz by swimming to Fisherman's Wharf in San Francisco while wearing handcuffs
  • At 45, completing a thousand push-ups and a thousand chin-ups in an hour and twenty-two minutes with blisters under his calluses
  • At 60, swimming from Alcatraz to Fisherman's Wharf handcuffed, shackled and towing a thousand-pound boat.
  • At 70, battling currents while handcuffed and shackled, towing seventy boats holding seventy people for a mile and a half across Long Beach Harbor.

Even at age 94, LaLanne was still exercising for two hours every day. 90 minutes of strength training. 30 minutes of swimming or walking. 10 raw vegetables. Every. Single. Day. For 60 years.



More information:
» Men's Fitness: "What We Learned from Jack LaLanne"

No comments: