Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Found Footage: Chop And Steele, K-Strass and Chef Keith

#GiveThanksForStrength #ChopAndSteele

Deadspin:
Local morning news shows have a lot of air to fill each day. So when a pair claiming to be an inspirational strongman duo blasted out a press release—citing a nonexistent tour and an America’s Got Talent appearance, and offering no video or documentation—they were immediately booked by seven different shows across the country.

Chop and Steele eventually appeared on three shows, in Eau Claire, Wisc., Bismarck, N.D., and Allentown, Penn., before canceling their other appearances due to being “stressed out.” Those three appearances were enough for some awe-inspiring demonstrations of their prowess.

Pickett and Prueher say none of the newscasters were upset about their appearances—or at least kept their reservations to themselves. But one station did email the day after the broadcast, asking for Chop and Steele’s credentials.


Little is known about "K-Strass," who goes by Kenny Strasser, or sometimes Karl Strassburg. He claims to be from Wisconsin (except when he doesn't). He claims to be from a broken home, with his own addiction issues (except when he isn't).

All we know is that K-Strass has shown up on television six times in the past month, showing off his yo-yo "skills" and generally embarrassing the hosts.



Over the holidays, Keith Guerke appeared on five morning shows in Wisconsin and Illinois to promote his new cookbook and prepare some meals made from leftovers. One little problem: Chef Keith doesn't know how to cook.

You might have guessed by now that K-Strass and Chef Keith are kindred spirits. K-Strass, portrayed by Mark Proksch was co-created by Joe Pickett. Pickett and co-conspirator Nick Prueher, who are responsible for Chef Keith, are the creators of the Found Footage Festival, which begins touring this week. Prueher played the part of Chef Keith, and said the reporters and anchors couldn't have been nicer to him—even after the segments went awry.

Prueher and Pickett said it wasn't tough to make in on the air at the five stations (in Milwaukee, Rhinelander, and Wausau, and two in Rockford, Ill.), all desperate for holiday programming. But since most restaurants were closed for Thanksgiving and Christmas, the food used in the segments was day-old KFC.



More information:
» Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel: "Alleged yo-yo champ dupes TV shows"

Thursday, March 9, 2017

"How to hack your biology and be in the zone"

Alan Watkins is the founder and CEO of Complete Coherence Ltd. He is recognised as an international expert on leadership and human performance. He has researched and published widely on both subjects for over 18 years. He is currently an Honorary Senior Lecturer in Neuroscience and Psychological Medicine at Imperial College, London as well as an Affiliate Professor of Leadership at the European School of Management, London. He originally qualified as a physician, has a first class degree in psychology and a PhD in immunology.

Whatever you decide to do (sports, hobbies, being healthy, driving, cooking, talking, etc!) you can hack your life and increase your rate of success! All you have to do is understand the concept of the Triune brain, control your breathing (Coherent Breathing), a 30/50% grip strength, and make your tools an extension of your body. Take all this with a perfect body weight transfer (mostly for sports), empty your mind and let your vision do the work.

Doing this perfectly will slow time so you can anticipate instead of reacting!

What you eat affects how you feel!

Brain Structure:
http://thebrain.mcgill.ca/flash/d/d_0...
http://cognitrn.psych.indiana.edu/bus...
http://developingchild.harvard.edu/ke...

Unconscious/Subconscious mind:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unconsc...

Control your Emotions:
http://www.takingcharge.csh.umn.edu/e...

Understand how Fear works:
http://www.takingcharge.csh.umn.edu/e...

Understand your Reward System:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reward_s...
http://neuroscience.mssm.edu/nestler/...

Self-Esteem:
http://cmhc.utexas.edu/selfesteem.html

Ego:
http://www.pathwaytohappiness.com/hap...

Exercise:
http://www.takingcharge.csh.umn.edu/e...

The importance of Sleep:
http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/news/st...
http://www.uphs.upenn.edu/news/News_R...

Compassion:
http://ccare.stanford.edu/

Gratitude:
http://www.health.harvard.edu/newslet...

Meditation:
http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FAcTI...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZjT83...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s-BWI...

Placebo/Nocebo Effect:
http://www.health.harvard.edu/newslet...
http://harvardmagazine.com/2005/05/th...

How to be successful - http://i.imgur.com/QDA8DHh.jpg

Don't forget to smile, you're stuck on a rock flying through space :)
http://i.imgur.com/km6oQMP.jpg

*(Last Update: January 1st 2017)

---

***You want to go deeper?***
The Wim Hof Breathing Method
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VaMjh...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=389c3...
-
We Are All ''One'': *
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptmXB...
-
Consciousness, a Quantum Physics Perspective: *
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KP486...

Saturday, February 25, 2017

Dengue Fever - "Cannibal Courtship"


AV Club:
Dengue Fever’s enduring love for an extinct period of Cambodian psychedelic surf-rock never weighs down its fourth album, Cannibal Courtship, but the band’s eccentric lyrical style sometimes does. “Cement Slippers” has a chorus with a New Pornographers-style keyboard hook—one of several welcome power-pop jolts on the album—hampered by verses that repeatedly fall flat as Chhom Nimol and a slop-voiced Zac Holtzman trade dull jokes about a couple having a shitty time together. The chorus of “Thank You Goodbye” (“you’re just another stamp in my passport”) can’t help but sound like a clumsy attempt to make another jet-setting love song like “Tiger Phone Card,” from 2008’s Venus On Earth. But when Nimol sings in her native Khmer and spreads her voice through the slow, eerie “Uku” and “Sister In The Radio,” Dengue Fever’s tiny corner of world music becomes deliriously entrancing again. The images of high-tech missiles on “Family Business” are just black-humored enough to complement the sinister cool of Holtzman’s guitar riff—they can pull off funny here and there—and Nimol’s vocal on the title track conjures Blondie as much as campy seduction. Cannibal Courtship once again proves that Dengue Fever is far more than tacky exotica, even when it can’t shake a few irritating personality tics.

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Spotlight: Leonard Cohen (1934-2016)


New Yorker:
At a certain point, if you still have your marbles and are not faced with serious financial challenges, you have a chance to put your house in order. It’s a cliché, but it’s underestimated as an analgesic on all levels. Putting your house in order, if you can do it, is one of the most comforting activities, and the benefits of it are incalculable.




Paste:
Cohen first released what is perhaps his most well-loved song, “Hallelujah,” on his seventh studio album, 1984’s Various Positions. The song has since been performed by nearly 200 different artists in numerous languages, a testament to the incredibly long shadow Cohen has cast over the world of music. Cohen’s star only continued to rise throughout the 1990s, his music reaching a larger and younger audience even as it gravitated towards darkness and social conflict. He was ordained as a Zen Buddhist monk in 1996, taking the Dharma name Jikan, or “Silence.” After five years of seclusion, he returned to writing, recording and touring, releasing two albums in the 2000s and embarking on a 2008-2010 world tour. Cohen’s masterful songwriting continued even into his 14th album, the recently released and unsurprisingly excellent You Want It Darker.

“If I knew where the good songs came from, I’d go there more often,” Cohen once said. We have no doubt he is there now.

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

"Those Who Stand For Nothing, Fall For Anything"

Quote Investigator:
An interesting precursor for the saying appeared in a Methodist church announcement in an Iowa newspaper from 1926. The word order and meaning were distinct, but the keywords were the same. In 1927 the same precursor was printed as a “Sermonogram” in an Ohio newspaper:
It is easier to fall for anything than to stand for something.
Thanks to Andrew Steinberg for locating and sharing these nascent citations.

The earliest evidence of close match known to QI was published in the January 1945 issue of a journal called “Mental Hygiene”. At the time of publication World War II was still being fought. The adage appeared in an article by the medical doctor Gordon A. Eadie titled “The Over-All Mental-Health Needs of the Industrial Plant, with Special Reference to War Veterans”. Boldface has been added to excerpts:
We are trying to show him not only what we are fighting against, but what we are fighting for. So many of these boys have only a very hazy idea of the real issues of the war. About all they see is “going back to the good old days.” This is a dangerous state. If they don’t stand for something, they will fall for anything. They need to realize that we are fighting two wars—the war of arms and the war of ideas—that other war of which the war of arms is one phase.
The important reference work “The Dictionary of Modern Proverbs” from Yale University Press has an entry for this adage and points to the same journal and year for its earliest citation.
Although the saying was employed by Gordon A. Eadie it is not clear whether he crafted it. A few months later the adage was spoken by the popular film actress Irene Dunne during a radio broadcast as indicated below. QI believes that it is reasonable to categorize this expression as an anonymous modern proverb.

The common attribution to the eighteenth-century statesman Alexander Hamilton was probably based on a mistaken understanding of a relatively modern citation. A different man named Alex Hamilton who was a British broadcaster used the saying in 1978. Details are given further below.
Here are additional selected citations in chronological order.

In May 1945 the movie star Irene Dunne participated in a radio program called “Town Meeting of the Air” according to “Radio Life Weekly” magazine, and she spoke a version of the saying:
Before three thousand interested spectators, Irene Dunne, Eddie Cantor, Will Durant and Rev. J. Herbert Smith brought the “Town Meeting of the Air” to Los Angeles with a bang—or should we say a clang…. Miss Dunne capably summed up the affirmative by stating that “If we don’t stand for something, we’ll fall for anything.”
In July 1945 the mass-circulation “Reader’s Digest” published the saying as a short freestanding item and credited the words to Dunne. “Reader’s Digest” functioned as an important locus for the popularization of quotations:
If we don’t stand for something, we will fall for anything.
— Irene Dunne on America’s Town Meeting of the Air
In November 1945 a newspaper in Canton, New York printed a short announcement about a church service. The expression was used as the title of a sermon by Theodore DeVries:
The Presbyterian Church. Rev. Theodore DeVries minister. Church service at 10:30. Sermon topic. “If We Don’t Stand For Something, We Fall For Anything”. Church School at 11:40.
Also in November another pastor named A.J. Whitney used an instance of the saying as a sermon title as recorded in a Cooperstown, New York newspaper:
Pastor, Rev. A.J. Whitney “If you don’t stand for something, you’ll be sure to fall for anything.”
Wednesday, November 28: Weekly prayer meeting at the parsonage at 8 p.m.
In 1946 an Albany, New York newspaper reported on a meeting of the National Woman’s Party with about 50 attendees. An instance of the adage was mentioned:
Miss Grace Reavy suggested as a slogan for the group, “Unless you stand for something, you’ll fall for anything.”
At the start of legislative sessions in the U.S. Senate a daily prayer is typically offered by the Senate Chaplain. On April 18, 1947 Chaplain Peter Marshall spoke the following words:
Our Father, we yearn for a better understanding of spiritual things, that we may know surely what Thy will is for us and for our Nation. Give to us clear vision that we may know where to stand and what to stand for—because unless we stand for something, we shall fall for anything.
The above valuable citation was listed in the landmark reference “Respectfully Quoted: A Dictionary of Quotations Requested from the Congressional Research Service”, and today the saying is sometimes ascribed to Peter Marshall; however, the 1945 citations reveal that the expression was already in circulation before 1947.

In 1948 “The Rotarian” magazine printed an excerpt from a speech given at a Rotary club that referred to the statement by the Senate Chaplain though the phrasing presented differed from the original prayer:
It is something like the present chaplain of the Senate said recently in one of his moving prayers at the recent special session, “Lord, help us to stand for something, because a man who stands for nothing will fall for anything.”—From a Rotary Club address.
In 1968 Evan Esar’s massive compendium “20,000 Quips and Quotes” presented two variants of the statement:
(1) Some people stand for nothing because they fall for everything.
(2) The people who fall for everything probably stand for nothing.
In 1973 “Time” magazine printed the remarks of peace activist and clergyman William Sloane Coffin Jr. who recounted the advice that he gave to an undergraduate:
My line to him as to so many students in the 1950s was: ‘You’re a nice guy but not yet a good man. If you don’t stand for something, you’re apt to fall for nothing!’
A version of the saying was included in the “Oxford Essential Quotations” database of the “Oxford Reference Online” system. The words were credited to a British writer and broadcaster named Alex Hamilton whose birth date was specified as 1936:
Those who stand for nothing fall for anything.
‘Born Old’ (radio broadcast), in Listener 9 November 1978
The 1978 citation date highlighted the distinction between Alex Hamilton and the U.S. founding father Alexander Hamilton, but confusion has persisted and incorrect attributions have been frequent.
In 1990 a letter was printed in “SPIN” magazine from Bill Finley who worked for another magazine called “In These Times”:
To paraphrase Gil Scot-Heron’s grandmother’s words: If you don’t stand for something, you’ll fall for anything.
In conclusion, QI believes this saying is a modern proverb with unknown authorship. A precursor was in circulation by 1926, and the earliest known close match occurred in an article by Gordon A. Eadie in 1945. Hence, some may wish to credit Eadie. Yet, antedatings are possible in the future. Actress Irene Dunne helped to popularize the expression with her radio appearance and the reprinted quotation in “Reader’s Digest”.

Friday, February 17, 2017

Run The Jewels


"At some point in the future they are going to try and label us a political rap group, and that we are not, we do not care what political party you belong to, we don't care who you supported, we don't care what you are doing tomorrow politically, we care that socially every one of you know; you are absolutely born free and nothing has a right to interrupt that freedom. We love you." - Killer Mike